Thursday, July 21, 2005

My posts are getting longer as the frequency reduces. Am I falling into the description trap; that which must never be fallen into just like the one who must not be named? And yes, my roommate bought a copy of the Half-Blood Prince and no, I haven't read it yet. Am queuing it for the weekend, right behind Foucault and Ghosh. Also finished reading Saffran-Foer's book today. The second one, 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close'. He's inventive, I must give you that. Even his treatment of grief is sufficiently novel without taking away from its visceral, selfish, experience. But beyond that, can he be a story-teller? I don't think so...somehow I seem to have developed a taste for the wide-angle lens and Foer opens a lens only to fold it inwards into unending involution. His prose is beautiful in parts and sentences sometime strike you out of the blue with their uncanny precocious cleverness. But the story? No, nada, nyet....I have been spoiled by the maestros, I don't understand this...and yet, maybe this is here to stay...so all I can do is count myself among the geriatrics and entomb that which I think to be good and true ....and stay there....

On other fronts, have a million different things to write on and some clear thinking to do. This month needs to be decisive in so many ways. And no, it's not a big thing. Just a clearer understanding of academic goals for the year and travel plans for the semester and other such. Hocus-focus and may the rain fall and the stars shine...I have to get back to work...
But last scavenging words, check...

"The Miss World pageant, as one of the most watched, if not the most watched televised event in the world, suggests that, when it comes to popular culture, at the very least, a more nuanced figuring of temporality than globalization is needed. In terms of the pageant's flexible and hybrid production, its massive and culturally diverse audience, it is clearly globalized. In terms of its rules of competition, its reliance on the nation-state for its organization of representation, it is postcolonial. In terms of the race and gender norms it celebrates and inculcates, it is modern and colonial. It can perhaps teach us that Raymond Williams's configuration of the temporal terrain of a periodizing impulse remains indispensable, as globalization moves from the emergent to the dominant, holding the colonial and postcolonial as the vestigial and the residual, struggling to read the resistant (Williams 1977, 129-35; and Williams 1980)."
World Piece - What the Miss World Pageant Can Teach about Globalization, Neville Hoad
(Cultural Critique 58 (2004) 56-81)

if that whets your appetite, the article is available online...
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/cultural_critique/v058/58.1hoad.html

I need to take a class with this guy!!!

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